So You Want To Study… Film and Television!

Hello all! This week’s “So You Want To Study” post, in fact, comes from yours truly.  I spent four glorious years studying Film and Television Studies at the University of Glasgow, and I had an absolute ball.  So today I thought I’d tell you all about it, in case you are considering taking the leap and studying it yourself!

so-you-want-to-study-film-and-television

I like to think the incredible television show 24 is responsible for my decision to study Film and TV.  Sure, I’d loved films and television all my life, but it wasn’t until I watched that first series, seeing Kiefer Sutherland as Jack Bauer for the first time, experiencing the revolutionary style of the show, and becoming consumed not only by the storyline, but by the entire process of the show, that I realised I was more than just your regular TV fan.  I was fascinated, watching the behind the scenes features on the DVDs time and time again, reading interviews with the producers and writers online, and writing my own little reviews (which the world never saw – I didn’t have a blog back then!).  I just thought it was incredible, and I remember thinking – I could keep watching and talking about this forever, and never run out of things to say.

The first thing I’ll say about making the decision to study film and TV, is that you have to figure out whether or not you are interested in the technical side of things.  This will decide which sort of course you should apply for, and will therefore affect which university you attend.

I, however, wanted to write about films and television, learn about the history of these two mediums we take so much for granted nowadays, and explore the ways in which they interact with and influence our society.  I wanted to study different genres, and talk about different writers.  Basically, I wanted to do an English Literature degree, but studying the big and small screens instead of books.

So if you decide that sounds like the kind of course for you, keep reading! It was one of the best experiences of my life, and while I might have gone on to study a Masters in something different, I wouldn’t change those four years for the world.

False Perceptions…

One thing to expect from a film and television studies course is that, despite the fact it is a widely respected subject now, you will still meet the odd person who, when you tell them what you’re studying, will say: “Is that even a thing?!”, or “Yeah, because sitting watching films all day counts as studying.” Ignore them.  Films and television shows have a huge impact on our society, from the traditional notion of “Water Cooler” conversation pieces, to the way news is reported (which is particularly interesting in terms of politics at the moment).  Today, social media allows us to share in global television experiences, and even things like the certification process of movies is inextricably tied to our ideas of what is age appropriate – something which, I can tell you, has changed a lot over the years. The types of films and shows made in different countries can tell us so much about different cultures, and don’t even get me started on the gender and sexuality implications of what we see on screen (trust me, the Gender and Sexuality module, which was part of my second year course, was one of my favourites – we could be here all day!).

Don’t Study Film and Television if…

1) … you don’t like the idea of the way you view films and TV changing.  It sounds obvious, but once you study something, it becomes very difficult to view it in the way you did before.  Once you’ve broken down film conventions, TV trends, audience engagement, and all of the other things you will look into over the three or four years of your studies, it inevitably changes your relationship with it.  I’ve had people say to me countless time “But surely you can’t enjoy it if you’re analysing it all the time? Can’t you just sit and watch a film?”  The answer to that is, I don’t know.  In some ways, I don’t think I can just watch a film any more, but truthfully, I wouldn’t change that.  I LOVE talking about and analysing television (if you’ve seen my original YouTube channel, you’ll be only too aware of this fact!).  I still get completely caught up in the story of whatever I’m watching, but I do always notice the writing and the camera work, and I always question why certain decisions were made behind the camera. And nine times out of ten, I will go online afterwards and start reading up more about whatever I’ve just watched.

2) … you don’t like watching subtitled films.  This is one I’ve heard a lot – people saying they “just can’t concentrate on watching the film and reading the subtitles at the same time”.  If you choose to study film and television, you will be viewing subtitles on a very regular basis, sometimes doing entire units worth of foreign cinema.

3) This leads me on to point three – don’t study film and television studies if you only like Hollywood blockbuster movies.  They will make up a very small portion of what you watch over the years. You will watch a lot of incredible indie movies, as well as some very strange, often very disturbing films. Eventually you will become somewhat immune to these, but prepare to be slightly mentally scarred to begin with. Ever heard of Jean-Luc Godard’s “Weekend”? Yeah. That was an experience.

4) … if you think it’s going to be easy. I once did an entire module on Children’s Television and spent five hours at a time watching and analysing In the Night Garden and Lazy Town  – in theory, that sounds like a breeze, but (aside from the fact that after an hour of Lazy Town you’re already close to losing your marbles), the critical theories involved are far more complex than you might imagine.  There are a lot of essays, even more reading, and, quite possibly because there are still some people out there who question the subject, your lecturers will be sure to really challenge you, so you have to be prepared to really put in the work. It so worth it though!!

What might you study?

Every course will be different, but the following list makes up the modules I studied over the course of my four years of uni:

In first year, we studied two large modules titled “Reading the Screen: Cinema”, and “Reading the Screen: Television”.  In second year, our modules were titled “History, Aesthetics and Genre”, and “Spectatorship, Audiences and Identities”.  Then, in our Honours years (3rd and 4th year), we were free to select  individual modules from a long list.  I chose: Film Analysis, Television Analysis, Contemporary Television Drama, Media and Cultural Policy, Asian Cinema, Screen Audiences, Screen Performance, Animation, Scotland: Film and Television, Children’s Television and, my compulsory Dissertation.

My dissertation was 12,500 words long, and examined the representation of familial relationships in teen television.  I studied Veronica Mars and Gossip Girl, examining the trend of complicated parent/child relationships on television aimed at a young audience.  I can say, hand on heart, I loved researching and writing my dissertation, and it makes me sad that I don’t hear more people say that.

I should also mention at this point that on my particular course, by third year there were a couple of more practical modules to choose, which involved some behind the camera work for the more practical-work-orientated students!

The best things about it?

One of my favourite things about my course was the passion everyone felt for what they were studying. In my experience, film and television students are an incredibly passionate bunch.  Yes, you will meet a few pretentious people along the way – but I’m willing to bet that’s the case with every creative subject. The love we all had for films and television led to fascinating conversations, lively debates, and some brilliant essays. Secondly, I got to write about such a wide variety of film and televisual texts, and discovered films and genres I would never have found, or given a chance otherwise.  But most importantly, it completely widened my horizons, gave me much more cultural awareness (not only of our own media and culture, but of cultures at an international level), and taught me so much about how interconnected our society is with what we’re watching on screen.  It also opened my eyes more than ever to issues of gender inequality and feminism, thanks to some of my absolutely incredible lecturers.

All in all, it was an amazing experience, and I was genuinely heartbroken when we graduated and it was all over. Aside from the course itself, I met some of my best friends during those four years , and it was our love for what we were studying that brought us all together *cue sentimental music*…

So, to any of you out there considering studying Film and Television Studies, I hope this post was helpful! Let me know in the comments if you are on a similar course at the moment, or if you’re heading off to study it after the summer!

Thanks for reading, and have a great weekend!

Lynsey x

   YouTube | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Instagram | Google+

Advertisements

So You Want To Study: Digital Media!

It’s that time of week again! Friday’s are all about sharing our experiences of studying different courses, and I’m loving posting these fantastic guest posts from students or graduates. This week’s post comes from Jilly, the lovely blogger behind My Name Is Jilly, who is studying Digital Media. If you like the sound of that, keep reading, and you might find that this is exactly the course for you!

so-you-want-to-study-digital-media

When you make the decision to study, either at College or University, it doesn’t always mean that you know exactly what you want to do with your life. After leaving school at the end of 5th year, I managed to get into University a year early to study a Bachelor of Arts degree in Digital Media. I’ve always been into media, whether it be watching the news or writing my blog, so I took a risk and decided to make it my career objective and to study it at University.

I wanted to study Digital Media because I had always had bad experiences with journalists. Having a family member who regularly featured in the news gave me exposure to the harsh reality of cut throat journalism. I wanted to aspire to become a better journalist than those I had encountered. I love to write, one of the main reasons I started my blog, and so I decided to go for it!

My course consists of Film Studies, Writing for the Media, Radio and also some design aspects. If you’re looking for a course which can give you a few career paths, then I would definitely  recommend Digital Media at the University of Stirling. The most surprising thing about my course was how much freedom we had, being able to choose what we could write about and the medium in which we presented information, in documentaries, radio shows and magazines. At school you are very much restricted in how you do things and I love how University allows you to choose what you’re best at and go with it.
The reality of Digital Media is that if you hate writing, it’s not the course for you. Even if you want to make documentaries or radio shows, the workload of writing is intense. Last semester I had over 14 essays due, totally around 10,000 words written which is a lot! Even when making documentaries, you must fill out risk assessments, schedules and treatments, making it just as heavy writing wise as making a magazine.

In our course, we don’t have exams in first or second year. Instead, we do a graded unit which sees us making a documentary, magazine, film or online content. Although this means you don’t have the pressure of exams, the workload means that you have strict deadlines which cannot be changed, meaning that organisation is key to pass the course.

All of this aside, I would’t change my course for the world as I feel like I’ve already learned so much in the such a short space of time. If you have any more questions which I haven’t covered please feel free to contact me!

jilly-so-you-want-to-study-ditigal-media

Thanks so much to Jilly for writing this post – I have to admit, I’m now seriously intrigued by her course, it sounds as if it would have been right up my street! Why can’t I just stay at uni forever and go and study course after course?!

Hope you’re all having a lovely day, and if you have exams this week I wish you lots of luck!

Have a great weekend!

Lynsey x

  YouTube | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Instagram | Google+

How To Deal With Feeling Overwhelmed At Uni

While uni is brilliant fun, and a time to make new friends, go on fun nights out and (hopefully) learn a thing or two, it’s no secret that studying at university is a lot of work. Whatever course you’re on, and whatever stage you’re at, sometimes things can just get a little bit overwhelming, and the stress of course work and exams, sometimes combined with things like juggling a part time job with your studies, or feeling homesick, can all become a bit too much.  So, if you’re feeling a bit anxious and overwhelmed, it’s important to find a way to destress! Here are a few things I found useful over my time at uni, to take my mind off things during the most hectic times of year!

how-to-deal-with-feeling-overwhelmed-at-uni

Go for a walk:

Never underestimate the power of going for a short walk. If you’re feeling worked up and stressed, putting the books to one side, picking up your iPod (or whatever you listen to music on!), and going for a walk around the block can really help to calm you down. Exercise releases endorphins, hormones which can have a calming effect on the body and mind. These hormones are shown to improve self-esteem and combat stress, so taking time out for a twenty minute walk not only is good for your physical health, but can have a great effect on how you feel mentally too!

Listen to music:

Listening to your favourite music can have an absolutely incredible impact on how you are feeling. For me, it’s one of the things that can have the biggest effect if I’m feeling anxious – listening to mood lifting songs (for me, it’s usually a bit of cheesy pop music, but go with whatever works for you!) can make me feel so much better. Concentrating on positive lyrics, or upbeat melodies can distract you from the anxious feelings you’re having, which leaves you feeling more relaxed when you eventually get back to work.

Try meditation:

If you had told me a couple of years ago I would find meditation so beneficial, I would probably have laughed at you. I had a complete misconception of what basic meditation involves, and I’m so glad I bit the bullet one particularly anxious day and downloaded the HeadSpace app. There are lots of meditation apps out there, so go and have a look for the one that sounds like it will work best for you (try a couple if they’re free downloads!), and give it a try! HeadSpace encourages you to take ten minutes each day just to sit, focus on your breathing, allow thoughts to come and go, and really increase your focus on the present moment. It sounds a bit out there, and it certainly won’t work for everyone, but I know that for me, and a few of my friends, it really does! I think a lot of our stresses in life come from concentrating on the future (what if this happens, what if this never happens, what if things don’t work out the way I expected…), which we can’t control, so learning to focus more on the present is important!

Watch an episode of your favourite television show:

As a self-confessed television addict, this is one that works an absolute treat for me every single time. Spending time with your favourite characters can be a brilliant distraction, and especially if it’s a show you’ve seen before and know well, you don’t have to concentrate too much on what’s going on. You can just get caught up in the storyline and get a bit lost in another world – one where whatever it is that has stressed you out doesn’t exist! Then, by the time the episode has finished, you’ve calmed down, and are feeling refreshed and ready to get back to it. Obviously this is a short term solution, but one that I totally recommend.

Sleep it off:

Sometimes, when things have got on top of you, there’s nothing else for it but to head to bed and sleep it off. When you have a lot of work to do, it can be tempting to try to just power through, no matter how you’re feeling, but that usually just results in feeling worse! And, let’s face it, you can’t do your best work when you’re feeling overwhelmed! So sometimes the best thing to do is to head to bed, watch a couple of episodes of something on Netflix, or read a couple of chapters of a good book, and go to sleep. Tomorrow is another day, and you might just find that a good night’s sleep has you waking up with a much clearer head and a more positive perspective!

So that’s it – my top five tips for dealing with feeling overwhelmed at university (or at any point in life, really!)! I hope you found that useful, and if you’re midway through your exams, I hope they are going well. Thanks so much for reading :)

What are your top tips for dealing with an overwhelming day?

Lynsey x

  YouTube | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Instagram | Google+

So You Want To Study: Interior Design!

Hi everyone! It’s another Friday, which means it’s time for another “So You Want To Study” post! I’m really loving this series – I find reading through these posts when they appear in my inbox so interesting, so I hope you are finding them useful!

This week’s post comes from the lovely Abigail from Abigail’s World! Abigail is studying Interior Design, and so I hope this post inspires any of you budding interior designers out there to go after your dream career!

So take it away, Abigail!

so you want to study interior design

I’m currently a third year interior design student on a four year ‘sandwich’ course – which basically means that in your third year you can do a year long work placement (which is optional), but I really wanted to do it. I’ve always been into art & design from a young age and when I was doing my art and design ‘diploma’ in years 10 and 11, I went to look around some new houses that were being built in my home town with my parents, as we were thinking of moving house. As soon as I stepped into them I was just like ‘WOW’ these look amazing, and from that point I knew that I wanted to be an interior designer. Although it was houses that originally got me into interior design, and I’ve always loved interior accessories for the home (even now I’m still doing homeware wish lists over on my blog), I knew that at university and in work afterwards, to get really into it, it would be commercial interiors that I would be designing. I then went on to college where I studied fine art, textiles, history of art and English for my A-Levels (along with a night course of life drawing) which I ended up taking to university interviews, architecture being one of the subjects I studied in my fine art class.

I applied to 5 different universities, some closer to home than others, and after going to 4 out of the 5 interviews, I knew which ones I wanted as my first and second choices – I placed these two, which were the University of Huddersfield as my firm choice, and the Cambridge School of Art within the Anglia Ruskin University as my second choice on my UCAS.  After a lot of coursework and exams, and a lot of waiting, I finally found out that I’d got into my first choice of Huddersfield University *yay*!

So in September 2012 I moved away from home (just two hours drive away) to Huddersfield after only being away from my family a week at the most before. I’ve met so many people at uni both in halls (who I’ve lived with for up to 3 years now) and through my course, some who I know are friends for life, and that’s part of the reason why I know coming to uni has been one of the best decisions I ever made. I was quite nervous that within the first year I would have to learn so many different computer softwares, but as I got talking to people that were going to be on my course I knew that we were all in the same boat. And when it did come around to our one two hour lesson of the softwares a week I actually really enjoyed it and I have learnt so much – and even more now I am on my work placement as they use most of the same softwares!

During the first year, which is pretty laid back compared to the rest, we first started by doing a group project, which really gets you to know the people you’re most likely to stick with for the rest of your time there. At the start of first year, quite a lot of people did drop out of the course because they either couldn’t handle the work load and/or the university life or decided it just wasn’t for them. Personally, in my first year I did projects on designing toilets, a hotel, bar and restaurant and a few other things as well as having an exam on the technical side of the course and creating sample boards.

Second year got a lot harder and everyone got a lot more serious with their work. The nights out partying soon got less often for the majority of us! Instead, our nights were mostly spent in the library until the early hours of the morning – which although it sounds quite scary, and at the time I guess it was with the stress we all go through when a deadline is soon approaching, I’m glad I did them as I got to see the outcome of my work, and my final grade of that year which I was really happy with. Along with the stress of the deadlines, most of us also decided we wanted to take a year out to do the sandwich course by doing a placement in an interior design office. After a lot of phone calls, emails and one or two interviews, I finally got a place where I would be designing work places. I have absolutely loved my placement year so far and I have learnt so so much, I would really recommend it. I now have another year left of the course from September which I am incredibly nervous about as I’ve heard how hard and stressful it has been for others, but I am also looking forward to it, and designing something all on my own again.

Let me know if you have any questions either about the course I’m studying or the university itself as I’d be happy to help. Abigail x

so-you-want-to-study-interior-design-abbie


Thanks so much to Abigail for taking the time to write this post! If you’d like to know more, you can tweet her at @AbigailsWorld94, or you can find her blogging away over at Abigail’s World!

Be sure to check back in next week for another instalment of this series, and there will be a new video live on my channel on Monday. This week’s video was an important one – I’d love your feedback on what type of videos you’d like to see, so pop over and leave me a comment if you get the chance, it would really help me out! :)

Have a lovely weekend everyone, and thanks for reading!

Lynsey x

 YouTube | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Instagram | Google+

3 Differences Between Undergraduate and Masters Study!

Hello all! Today I thought I’d talk a bit about what I found to be the main differences between studying my undergraduate degree, and studying a Masters.  I’ve mentioned enough times before that I had an absolute ball on both of my courses, but jumping into my Masters was certainly a learning curve, and so I thought I’d share my experience of that with you! This post, then, contains the three biggest difference I found, and how they impacted on my experience.

As a quick side-note – don’t be put off by points one and two.  It sounds intense, and it is, but it is so, so worth it!!3-differences-between-undergraduate-and-masters

1. The Workload

This is an incredibly obvious one, but the workload at Masters level is definitely a step up from undergrad! This will differ from course to course, but generally the amount of work you have to do will increase during postgraduate study.  In my case, I had seven modules, all done over the course of nine months (September to May), each with an equally intense workload. That meant assessments and/or exams for each in December/January, and the same again in April/May.  The April/May period was the most intense, with over 25,000 words worth of assessments, several group projects and an exam within the space of three weeks! This was followed by a 12,000 word dissertation between June and September.

What this taught me:

Time management, organisation and self motivation.

2. The Amount of Class Time

This is obviously connected closely to the first point, but I noticed a massive increase in the number of hours I spent in class between undergraduate and Masters! I was in class five days a week, pretty much 9-5, with the odd hour here or there free, which was a shock to the system after the relaxed timetable I’d had before! Again, this will vary depending on the course, but expect to spend a bit more time in the classroom again!

What this taught me:

Prioritising – the time outside of class becomes precious, and it’s important to use it effectively, both for studying and unwinding.  It also taught me that balancing a part time job with a Masters can be tricky!

3. The Dedication

One really positive thing about postgraduate study, which I mentioned in a recent video, is the fact that at this point, pretty much everyone who is on the course really wants to be there! Something I have a post planned on for some point over the next few weeks is how difficult it is to figure out what you want to do with your life, at any time never mind when you’re just seventeen or eighteen! A lot of people end up going to uni because they think it’s what they should do, or they aren’t really sure what else to do, and that can land them on a course that isn’t right for them. That lack of passion comes across, and can affect things like group work and even class morale.  At Masters level, however, people have already been through their first degree, so actively making the choice to come back and study some more suggests that this is something they are genuinely interested in, and means people will really work hard.

What this taught me:

That collective positive energy is great for keeping you going at some of the more stressful times of the year! When the whole group is striving to do well, it pushes you to do your best, and focus on the end goal (even when you’ve been in the library for what feels like a year of your life!).

I hope you enjoyed that post – I felt inspired to write it after filming my “My Masters Experience” video a couple of weeks ago. If you’ve gone through the undergrad to post-grad transition, what were the biggest changes you experienced?

Thanks for reading!

Lynsey x

 YouTube | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Instagram | Google+

So You Want To Study: Public Relations!

Happy Friday all – hope you’re having a lovely to start to the Easter weekend!

Today I’m delighted to bring you the second in the “So you want to study” series! This post comes from the lovely Sophie from Books and Beauty, who is here to give us a bit of insight into what it’s like to study PR!

Take it away Sophie!

So-You-Want-To-Study-PR

If you have always dreamed of working in the media, like myself, then a degree in Public Relations could be for you.

Since before I picked my GCSE’s subjects, I always knew I wanted to work in the media. When I say media, I mean magazines, newspapers and anything remotely related to that sector. Many people view ‘the media’ as the monthly glossy women’s magazines or daily national and regional newspapers. However the media is much more than that.

I always thought I wanted to study Journalism. I had the hazy view and false representation that journalism was interviewing celebrities and attending star studded events, possibly even becoming a news presenter. I even lined up work experience at my local newspaper to give me experience before I started university because I was so determined to become a journalist. When I went to university to study it, I decided it wasn’t for me and researched other areas of the media where I could still express my creativity through writing and discovered Public Relations.

Choosing to study Public Relations was the best decision I ever made. I had no clue what it was about or what was required to become the best PR practitioner. University helped me with that and my time there and studying PR is something I consider as the best time of my life.

In a nutshell, Public Relations is engaging with the public through the many aspects of media; social, print, online, broadcast. You are the person responsible for getting a company or organisations voice and message across to hundreds and thousands of people, and when you do it right and see your work in publications, there is no better feeling.

Expectation vs Reality:

When first studying PR, many of my course mates, myself included, thought PR was like Absolutely Fabulous and everything related to Max Clifford. If you have that image of what PR is like, get rid of it! Not to dampen spirits, but Public Relations is much more than that. It’s about communication, engagement, listening, speaking.

I thought my course would be filled with girls who dreamed of working with celebrities and high profile clients. Not to say this won’t happen, because it could! But you won’t start off doing that straight away. Despite my course being 90% girls, there were also plenty of males who knew what sector of PR they wanted to work in and were ready to face the challenges and assignments thrown at us.

Assessment:

Public Relations assessment at university is 95% writing based. Assignments are the main type of assessment but you are also required to do presentations on topics related to PR. In your final year you are also required to complete a Dissertation on a topic of your choice, or an Applied Project where you undertake work experience at a company.

Modules:

This is the fun part! Each semester you study three modules based around PR. These may include:

– The History of PR – PR Practices – Events Management – Professional Writing – Corporate PR

– Community PR – Celebrity PR – Issues and Crisis Management – PR Theory – Contemporary Issues in PR

Those are just a selection of some of the modules you can expect to study when doing a Public Relations degree. Don’t let the titles of some of them put you off, though! Public Relations is an age old industry dating back to the 1900’s and despite only being recognised as an academic course around 30 years ago, the industry is continually developing and fast becoming a preferred course for those wanting to work in the media.

So-you-want-to-study-public-relations

I hope this gave you some insight into what it is like to study PR! I now work at a PR agency as a Junior Account Executive and absolutely love my job. If you would like to know any other information on Public Relations or university experiences, please contact me! I would be more than happy to help!


Thanks so much to Sophie for a great post! You can find her blogging at www.booksandbeauty.co.uk , follow her on Twitter at @SBookBeautyBlog or Instagram at sopheleanor, or drop her an email at sbooksandbeauty@hotmail.com :)

Have a lovely holiday weekend everyone, and I’ll see you on Monday for a new video!

Lynsey x

 YouTube | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Instagram | Google+

Study Tips: Backing Up Your Files!

Backing up your files, whether it’s a short essay plan, or your entire dissertation, is one of the most important things you can get into the habit of doing during your time at university.  We’re all so used to our computers doing exactly what we ask of them, but sometimes they decide not to play ball, and that can lead to disaster on hand in day if your saved file has inexplicably disappeared!

A student’s worst nightmare – you’ve finally finished that essay which has been weighing you down for weeks, and you head to the library to print it out, or send it via the uni’s electronic system, ready to have it out of your life for good.  You open the folder you could have sworn you saved it in, and it’s nowhere to be seen.  You have an hour till hand in and the assignment you’ve spent the past two weeks working on has vanished from your hard drive.

I don’t know about you, but the mere thought of that situation has me breaking out in a sweat! I was always particularly paranoid about making sure I had double, usually triple backed up my files as a student, so I thought I’d share with you a few different options you have to keep your assignments safely saved and ready to hand in at the deadline!

backing-up-your-files-university-tips

Copy on to a USB Stick

This first one is probably the most common way students back up their files.  After saving your essay to whatever file you’re keeping it in on your computer, copying it on to a USB stick is not only a super easy way to take your documents home from the library to work on it from the comfort of your bedroom, but it means you instantly have a second copy of your file which you can upload to a computer and print if you need to!

Upload to Dropbox

Dropbox-Back-Up-Your-Files

Ahh Dropbox.  I’m a fan of Dropbox.  Backing up your files on websites like this is brilliant because it doesn’t rely on you remembering to put your USB stick in your bag – there’s nothing more frustrating than getting to the library and realising your USB is sitting on your laptop at home! You can log on to any computer and get access to your files through Dropbox.  From word documents, PDFs and PowerPoint Presentations to photos and videos, you can store anything on here.  All you have to do is type in your log in details and BOOM, instant access to your file!

This system is also ideal for group work, as you can create shared folders (via email address) to upload your files to!

Email it to Yourself

A personal favourite of mine, I got into the habit early on in my university career of emailing my documents to myself as an extra way of backing them up.  Again, this is a useful way of doing it because it doesn’t rely on you bringing a disk or USB stick with you, and is easily accessible from any location, even your phone! It’s such a quick and easy way of ensuring you have an extra copy.

Upload to Google Drive

back-up-files-google-drive

Most of us have a Google account these days, but even if you currently don’t, it takes just a couple of minutes to set one up! I think the drive is a really handy aspect of the whole Gmail/Google system.  If you go into your Google Drive, which you can access by clicking on the little Apps box at the top of the screen (pictured above!), you can upload as many documents as you like.

Use an External Hard Drive

If you have a particularly huge piece of work to back up, it might be an idea to invest in a larger external hard drive.  Not only does this mean you have extra storage for life, but it means that if you run out of space on your USB stick, you have somewhere to save your work! This might be a pricier way of going about it, but it’s always something to consider!

Print a Copy in Advance

And finally we have the old fashioned way! Try to be environmentally friendly, and don’t print a new copy of your essay or report every time you make a change to it, but once you’re fairly sure it doesn’t require further editing, you can always print out one copy, just in case! This was something I tried not to do too often (thinking of the trees!), but if your internet is particularly temperamental, or you’ve had a bad experience with a USB stick in the past, this might make you feel a bit more secure!

So there you have it – six ways to back up your documents to ensure no essays go missing before the deadline!

What way do you usually back up your files?

Thanks for reading! Be sure to follow along on the various social media sites below!

Lynsey x

 YouTube | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Instagram | Google+